Posts

Massive Crime Reduction

George outside Paisley AbbeyA study and analysis of 12,000 individuals across Scotland has revealed that people are feeling safer in their communities and more importantly the likelihood of being a victim of crime has decreased.

 

The latest Scottish Crime and Justice Survey has been released and revealed:

• Crime continues to fall, dropping by 22 per cent since 2008-09

• The risk of being a victim of a crime has fallen from 20.4 per cent in 2008/09 to 16.9 per cent in 2012/13

• The risk of crime is lower in Scotland (16.9 per cent) than in England and Wales where the victimisation rate was 18.7 per cent in 2012-13

• Violent crime is on a long-term downward trend, falling by 25 per cent since 2008-09

• Three quarters of adults (76 per cent) perceived the crime rate in their local area to have stayed the same or reduced in the past two years compared to 69 per cent in 2008-09.

• Fear of crime is decreasing – 72 per cent of those surveyed felt safe walking alone in their local area after dark in 2012-13, an increase from 66 per cent in 2008-09

• However people continue to believe the likelihood of being a victim of crime is higher than the reality – in most cases the perceived risk is two or three times higher than actual risk and for some crimes such as mugging or car theft the perceived risk was 20 times higher.

• Confidence in the police is increasing – 73 per cent of people were very or fairly confident in the police to investigate incidents and 61 per cent thought the police were doing a good or excellent job in their local area

• Confidence in the justice system continues to improve with all comparable measures increasing between 2008-09 and 2012-13

 

Paisley’s MSP, George Adam said:

 

‘We continue to hear about crime being at its lowest for almost forty years but it is only with detailed analysis that this can be proven.

 

‘Crime falling by 22% since 2009 is quite a staggering figure with the 1000 extra bobbies on the beat playing their part.

 

‘In these days with rolling 24 hour news being filled with every bit of information that can be found can play its part in the perception of law and order.  These figures show that even the perception of being at the wrong end of crime has dramatically fallen too.

 

‘We must never be complacent.  We must all play our part as citizens to ensure that law and order prevails but we should appreciate everyone’s efforts, including the police, which has produced the results of this study,’

 

 

http://news.scotland.gov.uk/News/Overall-crime-trend-continues-to-fall-a22.aspx

 

Paisley Benefits from Increased Police Numbers

George outside Paisley Town HallPaisley is benefitting from the increase in police numbers from figures that have just been released. Police numbers in Strathclyde have increased by 7.5% since 2007, the region which Paisley draws its police officers. This means that there are now 585 more police officers in Strathclyde compared with 2007.

Speaking on the statistics, Paisley’s MSP, George Adam stated:

 ‘The safety of our communities is a priority and these figures reveal why there is a 37 year low on crime. Reducing and preventing crime protects our communities and stamps out the damage and costs associated with crime.

‘We must always push to do more. Good work has been done over the past few years but we all know that crime has not disappeared.

‘Record lows on crime, increased police numbers and the great work our officers do are only part of the picture. We all must do our part to keep crime low, whether it is to ensure our homes are as secure as possible or reporting suspicious events when we witness them.

‘The great thing about being Paisley’s MSP is that we still have a sense of community that has been removed from many large towns. These are not my words, these are the words of a well-known radio personality that recognises our Buddie mentality.

‘I welcome the increased police on our streets and I know that all Buddies will do their best to reach even better record lows on crime.’

 

 Link to statistics

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/publications